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Gold mining is a highly consumptive and environmentally destructive industry. In addition to the landscapes that is destroys, gold mining (especially open pit gold mining) creates massive amounts of toxic waste that often causes acid mine drainage and heavy metal contamination.
Gold mining and metal processing also uses vast amount of water and energy, often subsidized. It also utilizes dangerous chemicals such as cyanide in its leaching processes, posing a threat to local water systems.


Water Depletion
Water depletion is a major negative consequence of gold mining. The large amount of water required to run a gold mining operation exacerbates its impact on local communities, many of which are already experiencing drought.

Acid Mine Drainage
Open pit mining creates great waste for a small yield. On average, it takes 79 tons of waste to extract one ounce of gold, according to a conservative estimate by the No Dirty Gold campaign, a project of EarthWorks and Oxfam. The process involves grinding up ore, and then exposing it to cyanide in order to extract the gold. Sulfides in the crushed rocks interact with air and water to create sulfuric acid, which in turn creates acid mine drainage (AMD). In and of itself, AMD is harmful to ecosystems because it makes water too acidic to support life. Additionally, the sulfuric acid in AMD leaches out other substances from the waste ore, such as arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury, which can have disastrous health effects, and can contaminate both air and water. Gold mining has been linked to 96 percent of the world’s arsenic emissions.

Cyanide
Cyanide is the chemical-of-choice for mining companies to extract gold from crushed ore, despite the fact that leaks or spills of this chemical are extremely toxic to fish, plant life and human beings. Cyanide is a deadly chemical, used in the gas chambers of the Second World War and on death row in the United States between 1930-1980. The chemical has caused havoc in water systems across the world with over 30 spills in the last five years.

Fly Over of Barrick Gold's Mine in Lake Cowal
by Natalie LowreySpecial to protestbarrick.net
February 4th, 2013
On Monday 4th February 2013, Wiradjuri Traditional Owner, Nevillle 'Chappy' Williams and ProtestBarrick.net co-founders and editors Sakura Saunders (Canada) and Natalie Lowrey (Australia) took a cessna plane from Forbes to Lake Cowal in central western New South Wales, Australia to document a gold mine in the lake. The slideshow video of the recent flight over Lake Cowal shows Barrick's mine pit in the lake bed surrounded by water. On the flight there were hundreds of birds seen in the 1km square toxic tailings dams. Many of these birds have flown great distances to get here and cannot differentiate the difference between the water of Lake Cowal and the tailings dams of the mine. The contamination of water with cyanide and heavy metals by the mine is of major concern to Wiradjuri Traditional Owners and environmentalists.

Unveiling Medals, Veiling Abuse: A profile of the mines sourcing PanAm Medals
by compiled by Sakura Saunders
March 3rd, 2015
Barrick Gold and the Royal Canadian Mint today unveiled the design of the medals to be awarded to athletes at this summer's PanAm games. 4,000 competitions medals will be awarded during the course of both the Pan Am Games and the Parapan Am Games. But why are we using this opportunity to promote the irresponsible practice of open pit gold mining, especially considering that we get more than enough gold these days from recycled sources? Specifically, why are we celebrating a mining company whose abuses are well documented and widespread. To illustrate my point, let's look at the three mines highlighted as the sources of the PanAm medals.

Mine Landowners: Settle issues first
Post Courier
February 19th, 2015
Landowners along the Pogera river who were affected by environmental damages caused by the Porgera Gold Mine have petitioned the government to intervene on their request for the developer Barrick Gold to compensate them for the damages caused to their environment and river systems.

VIDEO: an inside look at Barrick's Porgera Mine in Papua New Guinea
This film originally appeared on French Television and offers an inside look on the ground at Barrick's Porgera Mine in Papua New Guinea.

Nevada court hears Barrick Gold-Philippines province appeal
by Ken RitterAP
February 4th, 2015
A Philippine island province that experienced mining waste disasters in the 1990s but has been unable to find a court to hear its claim for damages is asking Nevada's highest court to rekindle a nearly 10-year-old state lawsuit against Barrick Gold Corp.

Protest in Nevada: Mining companies must pay full costs to remedy harm EVERYWHERE they operate
by Catherine Coumans
February 3rd, 2015
Today, south of Canada in the US state of Nevada, lawyers for the Province of Marinduque squared off against lawyers for Barrick Gold. Marinduque is holding Barrick Gold responsible for providing remedy for multiple disastrous mine waste failures in Marinduque that have caused serious damage to major river and sea ecosystems and have harmed many Marinduquenos. Last year, Barrick tried to make the law suit go away by offering Marinduque $20 million (of which the province would only get about $12 million after legal and administrative fees). The Province of Marinduque rightly turned down this grossly inadequate offer with its many onerous conditions. And so, the Province is back in court continuing the battle against Barrick for a fair settlement that will allow the Province to clean up the mess that mining has left behind.

Dominican activists decry mining projects as ‘new form of colonialism’
by Renee LewisAl Jazeera
January 28th, 2015
If the beauty and clean water of Loma Miranda is the before of mining projects in the Dominican Republic, Cotui, a town just an hour away in the Sánchez Ramírez province, is the after. A red-tinged and shrunken waterway welcomes visitors to Cotuí. It once supplied fresh water to residents. “The animals already knew,” said Mayobanex Arias, a rancher walking his cattle across a bridge over the river. “They would test the water, then not drink it.”

Chile regulator says could cancel permit for Barrick's Pascua-Lama
Reuters
January 21st, 2015
Chile's environmental regulator is re-evaluating penalties on Barrick Gold Corp's Pascua-Lama project, a process that could include cancelling the embattled mine's permit, the head of the government body told a local daily newspaper.

Mine expansion may threaten Nevada's largest deer herd
by Jeff DeLong, RGJReno Gazette Journal
January 9th, 2015
The planned expansion of a major gold mine in northeast Nevada could cause big problems for Nevada's largest herd of mule deer, a sportsmen and conservationist group contends. The Coalition for Nevada's Wildlife is urging people to weigh in on Barrick Gold Corp.'s proposed expansion of its Bald Mountain Mine, a project the group insists could disrupt a key migration route used by deer in the winter.

‘Please tell people about this:’ London students’ horror at Dominican Republic mines
by Mark SpowartMetro
October 27th, 2014
Three London students were shocked by what they found last winter during a trip to the Dominican Republic. Canadian mining companies, they say, are destroying lives in the country.

Barrick Gold refuses to relocate villagers who suffer murder, rape and house burning
by Karl NerenbergRabble.ca
September 12th, 2014
On Wednesday of this past week, a representative of thousands of people who live in the highlands of Papua New Guinea together with Canadian supporters came to Parliament Hill to tell Canadians about the highlanders' troubled relationship with Barrick Gold.

PUBLIC DECLARATION FROM THE DIRECTORS OF THE AGRICULTURAL COMMUNITY DIAGUITAS HUASCOALTINOS
by Sergio Campusano VillchesPresident, Diaguita Huascoaltinos Indigenous and Agricultural Community
May 31st, 2014
In light of news of a potential negotiated agreement that would put an end to the social and environmental conflicts generated by the Pascua Lama project in the ancestral territory of the Agricultural Community of Diaguitas Huascoaltinos, we declare that this only deepens the relationship of confrontation that Barrick Gold has imposed in its relationship with the Community that owns the communal property of Diaguita.

Protesters to Barrick Gold shareholders: "We don't need gold, stop the unnecessary suffering": AGM Protest brings needed truth to corporate meeting
by Sakura SaundersProtestbarrick.net
April 30th, 2014
Over 100 people participated in a protest against Barrick Gold outside the company's annual general meeting this year. This annual protest highlights the realities and demands of communities living next to Barrick's mines around the world.

Barrick Gold Faces Demonstration Against Human Rights, Environmental Abuses at Toronto AGM
by Tim McSorleyDeSmog
Barrick Gold's shareholders will be greeted by a familiar sight in Toronto this morning: protesters are once again gathering outside the Annual General Meeting of the world's largest gold mining company to denouce the corporation's human rights and environmental abuses.

CEDHA offers expert testimony against Barrick Gold in Chilean Tribunals
CEDHA
April 27th, 2014
On the one year anniversary of the suspension of Pascua Lama due to impacts to glaciers and other water resources, Jorge Daniel Taillant, Director of the Center for Human Rights and Environment (in Argentina) spoke for two hours today before Chile’s Environmental Tribunal to answer questions regarding reports CEDHA has produced to draw attention to Barrick Gold’s Pascua Lama project impacts to hitherto ignored but extremely relevant swaths of land called Periglacial Environments. These frozen hydrological resources help glaciated areas store and regulate water flow to downstream water basins for millions of people.

Hearing in Grants, NM to review Barrick's Homestake site, where contamination has spread in recent years
by Steve Dylla and Candace Head-DyllaResidents of Grants, NM and members of the Multicultural Alliance for a Safe Environment (MASE) and the Bluewater Valley Downstream Alliance (BVDA)
April 25th, 2014
Once again, Homestake-Barrick Gold refuses to commit the resources needed to fully clean the contaminated water and once again NMED will find that acceptable. In the last discharge permit hearing (DP-725), we asked NMED to require Homestake-Barrick Gold commit to operating a reverse osmosis plant that could actually clean all the water from the site. It is the right thing to do, but Homestake-Barrick Gold will not spend the money required and NMED does not want to get on the wrong side of this powerful company. So, instead, Homestake-Barrick Gold proposes experimental methods that are unproven and likely dangerous, proposes an insignificant increase in reverse osmosis, and NMED will approve this proposal and claim they are supporting ”progress” and “innovation” rather than colluding with a company that is too rich and powerful for them to regulate.

Hearing in Grants, NM to review Barrick's Homestake site, where contamination has spread in recent years
Multicultural Alliance for a Safe Environment (MASE)
April 25th, 2014
The New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) is set to renew the Homestake Mining Company’s Discharge Permit, DP-200, with some modifications that would allow Homestake to nearly double its use of the public's water supply to dilute contaminants at its Superfund site.

Written Comments of Steve Dylla and Candace Head-Dylla regarding Homestake-Barick Gold Mining Company Uranium Millsite
by Steve Dylla and Candace Head-DyllaResidents of Grants, NM and members of the Multicultural Alliance for a Safe Environment (MASE) and the Bluewater Valley Downstream Alliance (BVDA)
April 25th, 2014
Once again, Homestake-Barrick Gold refuses to commit the resources needed to fully clean the contaminated water and once again NMED will find that acceptable. In the last discharge permit hearing (DP-725), we asked NMED to require Homestake-Barrick Gold commit to operating a reverse osmosis plant that could actually clean all the water from the site. It is the right thing to do, but Homestake-Barrick Gold will not spend the money required and NMED does not want to get on the wrong side of this powerful company. So, instead, Homestake-Barrick Gold proposes experimental methods that are unproven and likely dangerous, proposes an insignificant increase in reverse osmosis, and NMED will approve this proposal and claim they are supporting ”progress” and “innovation” rather than colluding with a company that is too rich and powerful for them to regulate.

Behind Barrick's meltdown in the Atacama desert
by STEPHANIE NOLENGlobe and Mail
April 24th, 2014
In Chile today, you could spend a very long time trying to find anyone with a good word to say about Pascua-Lama.

Barrick Gold Using Coercive Settlement Provisions to Perpetuate Legacy of Environmental Harm
by Michelle HarrisonEarth Rights International
March 31st, 2014
After nearly a decade of litigation over environmental devastation in the Philippines caused by Placer Dome’s mining operations (now Barrick Gold Corp.), Barrick has reportedly given the Province of Marinduque a take-it-or-leave-it settlement offer that would prohibit the Province from spending a penny to clean up the damage the company left behind.

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